People We Help 2017-06-03T08:05:56+00:00

People We Help

Jon Chapman contacted the charity in December 2014.  He had an initial diagnosis of three months to live from a misdiagnosed bladder cancer.  Team Verrico were able to plug Jon into the best medical care in the world: due to our links with Professor Justin Stebbing on Harley Street, John received an accurate diagnosis, treatment and surgery that ultimately led to his life being extended for a further two and half years.  While John’s death in April 2017 leaves an aching gap in his family, he was able to make many more memories for his beautiful wife and two lovely children due to this charity’s help.  At John’s funeral service, the order of service carried the charity’s motto ‘Never give up’.

Jon had left instructions for any donations received at the service to be sent to the charity to pay it forward to the next person to have a chance of more tomorrows with their families.

Our Mission

Team Verrico is a registered charity.

Your donations help young families, who are facing rare or hard to treat cancers, fight and win more tomorrows.

We fund research into treatment and diagnosis.

We bring hope where there is none.

Make A Donation

GIve As Much As You Can

Even The Smallest Donation Makes A Difference

Donate Now

Research

Team Verrico has focused on two research projects so far.

The first is at the University of Sheffield, where funds raised have been assigned to an individual PHD student who complete doctorate research into cancer and cutting edge treatments for the disease. (The DNA replication and repair group via David Meadows Development Officer, Legacies and Individual Giving, The University of Sheffield.)

The second project is that run by Professor Stebbing at Imperial College London, to further fund his ground breaking research into Triple Negative Breast Cancer. (Professor Justin Stebbings, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London).

People

The charity helps: To promote and protect the physical and mental health of sufferers and their families of particularly lethal medical conditions. Any money pledged to individual missions goes directly to that fund. Team Verrico’s involvement is raise awareness of these individual fights and wherever possible provide assistance and encouragement to additional fundraising efforts.

Rules

Like any charity regulated by the charity commission, there are rules which the charity must follow.

The full list of rules can be found at the charity commission web-site, at www.charitycommission.gov.uk but they include things like;

  • The trustees being unpaid volunteers
  • No-one connected to the charity benefitting from it
  • Only doing things that are charitable according to the law, and
  • Providing public, up to date information about its activities and finances.

Education

The charity seeks to further this objective through supporting the publication of research in the area of triple negative breast cancer and through producing informative films and events to raise awareness of the disease.

Loading...

Understanding Triple negative Breast Cancer

What is triple-negative breast cancer?

About 10 to 20 percent of breast cancers are triple-negative.

Knowing breast cancer basics can help you understand how triple-negative breast cancer is different from other types of breast cancer. Doctors search for the presence or absence of three receptors, proteins that live inside or on the surface of a cell and bind to something in the body to cause the cell to react. You may have heard of the oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2).

In oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, progesterone receptor-positive breast cancer and HER2 positive breast cancer, treatments prevent, slow or stop cancer growth with medicines that target those receptors. But triple-negative breast cancers need different types of treatments because they are oestrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative and HER2 negative. Medicines like tamoxifen, which targets the oestrogen receptor, and trastuzumab (Herceptin), which targets HER2, are not helpful in treating triple-negative breast cancer. Instead, chemotherapy has been shown to be the most effective treatment for triple-negative breast cancer.

Researchers are working to improve their understanding of the biology of triple-negative breast cancers, how these types of cancers behave and what puts people at risk for them. Their goals are to find out the best ways to use treatments that already exist and to develop new ones.

Understanding the ‘Basal-like’ Subtype

Most triple-negative breast cancers have a basal-like cell pattern. This term means the cells look like the basal cells that line the breast ducts, the tubes in the breast where milk travels.

Basal-like breast cancers tend to over express, or make too much of, certain genes that encourage cancer growth. Not all triple-negative breast cancers are basal-like, and not all basal-like breast cancers are triple-negative. About 70 to 90 percent of triple-negative breast cancers are basal-like.

Doctors choose treatments because the cancer is triple-negative, not because it is basal-like. The  basal status of the cancer does not factor into treatment decisions

Myth About Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

MYTH – Women with triple-negative breast cancer can have the same treatments as all other women with breast cancer.

FACT – Many people do not understand that there are different kinds of breast cancer. Even some women who have had breast cancer do not understand the differences between triple negative breast cancers and breast cancers that are hormone receptor-positive or HER2 positive.

Researchers are still learning why some women are more likely than others to develop triple-negative breast cancer. Research supports a relationship between risk and your genes, age, race and ethnicity.

Breast Cancer Gene Mutations

Everyone has BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, which we get from our mother and father. When they work properly, these genes prevent the development of cancers. However, less than 10 percent of people with breast cancer are born with a mutation, or abnormality, in BRCA1 or BRCA2.

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Risk Factors

If you are born with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation, you are at increased risk for developing breast, ovarian and other cancers throughout your life. The BRCA1 mutation puts you at higher risk for developing a basal-like breast cancer. Scientists are still trying to find out why BRCA1 mutations increase the risk of developing triple-negative breast cancer. Keep in mind, not all breast cancers from BRCA mutations are triple-negative. In fact, BRCA2 mutations are more likely to be present in oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.  If you have a family history of breast cancer, you and your relatives could carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. You could also be the first person in your family known to develop breast cancer because of a BRCA mutation. Knowing your BRCA status can help you and your doctors discuss an effective treatment plan and learn ways to reduce your risk for recurrence. A genetic counsellor can talk with you about genetic testing. Anna was tested and was NOT BRCA positive, but this is important information which can affect treatment options.

Age, Race or Ethnicity

Several studies suggest that being premenopausal, African-American, Latina or Caribbean increases  risk of developing basal-like or triple-negative breast cancer. Among African-American women who develop breast cancer, there is an estimated 20 to 40 percent chance of the breast cancer being triple-negative. Researchers do not yet understand why premenopausal women and women in some ethnic groups have higher rates of triple negative breast cancer.

Resources for more information: www.tnbcfoundation.org; www.triplenegative.co.uk